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Temas VariosLibros ImpresosTropical travel The representation of Central America in the 19th Century

SINOPSIS:

In this remarkable collection of primary documents, the author, professor of British and North American literature at the University of Costa Rica, has brought together twenty-one articles on Central American published in four of the most prestigious North American magazines of the nineteenth century between 1854-1895. Taken from , and , these articles cover six of the seven countries that today make up Central AmericaGuatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Using a wide range of documentation on the development of scientific racism in the mid-nineteenth century, the author traces the proliferation of theories of racial superiority and inferiority, showing how they came to influence many travelers to Central America and the image of Central America those travelers transmitted to readers in their home countries. Through an extensive analysis of the illustrations in these original articles and of the writings of Ephraim George Squier, chargé daffaires for the United States government to the Central American Republics in 1849 and in 1853, this book shows just how much truth there was in the assertion by African novelist Chinua Achebe when he wrote that travellers with closed minds can tell us little except about themselves.While most academic studies of travel writing come from the metropolis, this study speaks and writes back from the vantage point of the scrutinized and disparaged. This is one of the first collections of facsimiles that has been specifically put together to show Central Americans how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were imagined in popular magazines in the nineteenth century in New York and London. This massive volume of primary documents will serve as an indispensable sourcebook for future studies of travel writing about Central America for years to come. Harpers , and , these articles cover six of the seven countries that today make up Central AmericaGuatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Using a wide range of documentation on the development of scientific racism in the mid-nineteenth century, the author traces the proliferation of theories of racial superiority and inferiority, showing how they came to influence many travelers to Central America and the image of Central America those travelers transmitted to readers in their home countries. Through an extensive analysis of the illustrations in these original articles and of the writings of Ephraim George Squier, chargé daffaires for the United States government to the Central American Republics in 1849 and in 1853, this book shows just how much truth there was in the assertion by African novelist Chinua Achebe when he wrote that travellers with closed minds can tell us little except about themselves.While most academic studies of travel writing come from the metropolis, this study speaks and writes back from the vantage point of the scrutinized and disparaged. This is one of the first collections of facsimiles that has been specifically put together to show Central Americans how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were imagined in popular magazines in the nineteenth century in New York and London. This massive volume of primary documents will serve as an indispensable sourcebook for future studies of travel writing about Central America for years to come. New Montthly Magazine, and , these articles cover six of the seven countries that today make up Central AmericaGuatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Using a wide range of documentation on the development of scientific racism in the mid-nineteenth century, the author traces the proliferation of theories of racial superiority and inferiority, showing how they came to influence many travelers to Central America and the image of Central America those travelers transmitted to readers in their home countries. Through an extensive analysis of the illustrations in these original articles and of the writings of Ephraim George Squier, chargé daffaires for the United States government to the Central American Republics in 1849 and in 1853, this book shows just how much truth there was in the assertion by African novelist Chinua Achebe when he wrote that travellers with closed minds can tell us little except about themselves.While most academic studies of travel writing come from the metropolis, this study speaks and writes back from the vantage point of the scrutinized and disparaged. This is one of the first collections of facsimiles that has been specifically put together to show Central Americans how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were imagined in popular magazines in the nineteenth century in New York and London. This massive volume of primary documents will serve as an indispensable sourcebook for future studies of travel writing about Central America for years to come. Scribner´s and , these articles cover six of the seven countries that today make up Central AmericaGuatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Using a wide range of documentation on the development of scientific racism in the mid-nineteenth century, the author traces the proliferation of theories of racial superiority and inferiority, showing how they came to influence many travelers to Central America and the image of Central America those travelers transmitted to readers in their home countries. Through an extensive analysis of the illustrations in these original articles and of the writings of Ephraim George Squier, chargé daffaires for the United States government to the Central American Republics in 1849 and in 1853, this book shows just how much truth there was in the assertion by African novelist Chinua Achebe when he wrote that travellers with closed minds can tell us little except about themselves.While most academic studies of travel writing come from the metropolis, this study speaks and writes back from the vantage point of the scrutinized and disparaged. This is one of the first collections of facsimiles that has been specifically put together to show Central Americans how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were imagined in popular magazines in the nineteenth century in New York and London. This massive volume of primary documents will serve as an indispensable sourcebook for future studies of travel writing about Central America for years to come. Magazine, the Century Illustrated Magazine, and , these articles cover six of the seven countries that today make up Central AmericaGuatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Using a wide range of documentation on the development of scientific racism in the mid-nineteenth century, the author traces the proliferation of theories of racial superiority and inferiority, showing how they came to influence many travelers to Central America and the image of Central America those travelers transmitted to readers in their home countries. Through an extensive analysis of the illustrations in these original articles and of the writings of Ephraim George Squier, chargé daffaires for the United States government to the Central American Republics in 1849 and in 1853, this book shows just how much truth there was in the assertion by African novelist Chinua Achebe when he wrote that travellers with closed minds can tell us little except about themselves.While most academic studies of travel writing come from the metropolis, this study speaks and writes back from the vantage point of the scrutinized and disparaged. This is one of the first collections of facsimiles that has been specifically put together to show Central Americans how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were imagined in popular magazines in the nineteenth century in New York and London. This massive volume of primary documents will serve as an indispensable sourcebook for future studies of travel writing about Central America for years to come. the Atlantic Monthly, these articles cover six of the seven countries that today make up Central AmericaGuatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Using a wide range of documentation on the development of scientific racism in the mid-nineteenth century, the author traces the proliferation of theories of racial superiority and inferiority, showing how they came to influence many travelers to Central America and the image of Central America those travelers transmitted to readers in their home countries. Through an extensive analysis of the illustrations in these original articles and of the writings of Ephraim George Squier, chargé daffaires for the United States government to the Central American Republics in 1849 and in 1853, this book shows just how much truth there was in the assertion by African novelist Chinua Achebe when he wrote that travellers with closed minds can tell us little except about themselves.While most academic studies of travel writing come from the metropolis, this study speaks and writes back from the vantage point of the scrutinized and disparaged. This is one of the first collections of facsimiles that has been specifically put together to show Central Americans how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were imagined in popular magazines in the nineteenth century in New York and London. This massive volume of primary documents will serve as an indispensable sourcebook for future studies of travel writing about Central America for years to come. Using a wide range of documentation on the development of scientific racism in the mid-nineteenth century, the author traces the proliferation of theories of racial superiority and inferiority, showing how they came to influence many travelers to Central America and the image of Central America those travelers transmitted to readers in their home countries. Through an extensive analysis of the illustrations in these original articles and of the writings of Ephraim George Squier, chargé daffaires for the United States government to the Central American Republics in 1849 and in 1853, this book shows just how much truth there was in the assertion by African novelist Chinua Achebe when he wrote that travellers with closed minds can tell us little except about themselves.While most academic studies of travel writing come from the metropolis, this study speaks and writes back from the vantage point of the scrutinized and disparaged. This is one of the first collections of facsimiles that has been specifically put together to show Central Americans how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were imagined in popular magazines in the nineteenth century in New York and London. This massive volume of primary documents will serve as an indispensable sourcebook for future studies of travel writing about Central America for years to come. While most academic studies of travel writing come from the metropolis, this study speaks and writes back from the vantage point of the scrutinized and disparaged. This is one of the first collections of facsimiles that has been specifically put together to show Central Americans how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were represented, how they were spoken about, how they were imagined in popular magazines in the nineteenth century in New York and London. This massive volume of primary documents will serve as an indispensable sourcebook for future studies of travel writing about Central America for years to come.

Características:

Atributos LU
Año de Edición
2008
Descatalogado
NO
Tipo
Libro
Autor
Juan Carlos Vargas
ISXN
9789968460880
Idioma
Español
Núm. Páginas
571
Peso (Físico)
1270
Tamaño (Físico)
20 x 30.5
Título
Tropical travel. The representation of Central America in the 19th Century
Libros Impresos 3x2
Botón empaque navideño
ISBN: 9789968460880
Referencia: 25305

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